Faculty Perspectives: Current Guidelines and Emerging Treatments in Nonmetastatic NSCLC

TLG1823

Supported through funding from

Bristol Myers Squibb

Non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)—including squamous-cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large-cell carcinoma—accounts for 80% to 85% of all lung cancers. Of patients diagnosed with lung cancer (all types), 17% have localized disease (confined to the primary site), 22% have regional disease (spread to regional lymph nodes), 57% have metastatic disease, and 4% have an unknown stage. Read More ›

At Johns Hopkins Hospital, each specialist in my practice sees approximately 8 to 10 patients with nonmetastatic NSCLC per month, some of whom are not candidates for surgery based on physiologic parameters. In most cases, we follow the NCCN Guidelines or ASCO clinical practice guidelines in our management of patients with early-stage NSCLC, except in clinical scenarios where the patient may not fit into a particular category within the guidelines, or when we enroll a patient in a clinical trial. For example, we may determine that a neoadjuvant clinical study is appropriate for a patient with stage IB NSCLC, whereas this recommendation is not concordant with the NCCN Guidelines. There are also instances in which we apply recently published clinical study data when managing our patients—even before the NCCN Guidelines have been updated to reflect the most recent findings. Read More ›

In my medical oncology practice at Johns Hopkins, I see approximately 4 patients with nonmetastatic NSCLC per week. Most of these patients are referrals from either pulmonary medicine or thoracic surgery. A patient with early stage disease initially sees a pulmonologist for diagnosis and may then be referred to a thoracic surgeon. The thoracic surgeon may refer the patient to us in medical oncology if there is an indication to enroll the patient in a clinical trial or for systemic therapy. In a community oncology practice, patients tend to go to surgery first and are then referred to the medical oncologist for adjuvant chemotherapy. In academic centers, it is more common for patients to be seen in a multidisciplinary setting. Read More ›

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